How To Store Emails In An External Storage

When the first computer debuted for the public, most people used it as a form of communication. When emails made it to computers, the communication world was opened even more. You can reach anyone around the world. All that’s needed is one account. Or more. Today, you can choose from different email providers like Zoho, Gmail, Proton, Outlook, Yahoo, and more.

Like our documents, photos, videos, and other media content, programs and software, our emails can be just as important. They are forms of documented conversations between two parties that can come handy and helpful one day. Therefore, they should be stored in another storage device or the cloud as well. Simply put, emails are important too and should be backed up.

Storing your email archives for a long time can be done in different ways. There’s external storage, network, or cloud. Let’s take a look at each of them.

External storage includes external storage devices such as USB, memory cards, external SSD, or the more popular and widely used external hard drive. They are more popular because they offer large storage capacity, portability, and efficiency at a relatively affordable price.

External hard drives are easy to use too. But they can be prone to physical damage.

External hard drives are an attractive solution to long term data storage needs because of the extreme ease of use. In nearly all cases, all you need to do is to plug the hard drive into your computer with a USB cable and the drive is displayed to you in the file manager. From this point, all you need to do is to drag and drop your data files, such as your email archives, directly to this drive and they are copied. The only possible concerns for these devices arise if you travel with them or move them around often. There is only one hard drive inside and the reliability of that hard drive depends on the precision of the mechanical parts of the drive being able to read the disk. Dropping the drive can cause internal mechanical damage which, in some cases, can result in loss of your data.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-to-save-emails-to-an-external-hard-drive)

 

Saving through a network, or more commonly called Network Attached Storage (NAS) is another way. But it can be complicated.

Network Attached Storage (NAS) devices are a bit more complex than simple USB-based external hard drives. This is because NAS devices include the ability to connect to your home’s network using either Wi-Fi or Ethernet and then to offer data archive access for any computer connected to your home network. Such devices can be made more reliable than an

Different Types of Programs For Your Computer

Have you ever wondered what kind of program you are using for a specific task? Or do you just simply use one without minding what type it is? Whatever the case is, computers need programs in order for a software to run. Programs perform specific tasks depending on what you choose. They help us do our tasks when we’re using the computer.

Programs are instructions. And the first ones created were only 17. Today, the number has surpassed a billion. Pretty extreme, huh? To put it simply, programs are what comprise a software. A software is a collection of programs that you run for it to perform a task. And by run, you need to open it.

These programs or software have been helping us today in every task we do. It’s true because they are also on our phones and tablets which makes computing a whole lot easier and portable.

There are several software for productivity tasks. These might be one of the first ones developed and arguably the most widely used programs. This is because they are efficient and can multitask.

Productivity applications comprise some of the most commonly used software programs in the world, especially in work settings. One of the reasons people use computers is to take advantage of the efficiencies of productivity software. The two most common types of productivity programs are word processors for typing and formatting documents, and spreadsheets for organizing and tabulating numerical data. Other productivity software includes slideshow applications for giving lectures and presentations, formula editors for writing mathematical equations, and media editing programs for making graphics, video and sound.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/types-of-computer-programs)

Computer programs also exist for web or internet use in the form of web applications.

The Internet is another reason people use computers, and a variety of computer programs facilitate different kinds of Internet use. Web browsers download and render HTML content into the Web pages that dominate the Internet. Email clients make possible the exchange of virtual correspondence. FTP clients enable the upload and download of files to a Web server — a common part of maintaining a website. Chat clients and messaging programs let people type, talk and videoconference with one another. Many programs, such as weather widgets and stock market tickers, have an online component that continuously updates the information on your computer.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/types-of-computer-programs)

And of course, game and leisure programs. Arguably, these are what make a person stay glued on their computers. Some don’t really like spending hours and hours doing work-related tasks. But playing games? This is true for some people, and some people only. The same goes for leisure.

The

How To Transfer Files Between Computers

Transferring files from one computer to another is important. Think of it like transferring dinner plates from the cupboard to the dinner table. You can carry them by hand. You can use a tray. You can use a trolley. And you can ask someone to carry them for you. But definitely cannot throw them though. Anyway, there are many ways on how to transfer a file from one computer to another. And this article will show you how.

 

The ideal way to go will depend on the number or amount of files you want to be transferred and the computer that will do the transferring and receiving. Transferring from PC to PC can be easy. But from a PC to Mac or vice-versa can be tricky.

 

Using external storage devices is the simplest. A USB or external hard drive can be connected to the computer, copy the files, safely remove it (or not), then plug it into a Mac or PC to transfer the files.

Transferring files to a USB drive or an external drive and then to another computer has the added benefit of supplying you with backup copies of your files, but it’s one of the slowest methods and comes with added expense. You’ll need to purchase the storage device, which can range in price from less than $50 to a few hundred dollars, depending on size and other features.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-do-i-transfer-files-from-one-computer-to-another-computer)

 

Files can also be transferred through a local network.

You may be able to transfer files between computers on the same network if both computers are within range. When configured correctly, computers on the same network can access each other’s hard drives and files can easily be moved between them. In Windows 10, simply access the file or folder you want to move in File Explorer, press the right mouse button over it and select Give access to. A dropdown menu displays the options Specific people and Remove Access that allow you to enable or disable access to the file by other network users.

You can also use the Nearby Sharing feature in Windows 10 to share files with nearby computers and tablets running Windows 10 over Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. First, enable the feature under Shared experiences in Settings on both computers. Then access the file you want to share in File Explorer, press the right mouse button and select Share. The Share panel is displayed, showing other enabled devices within range for sharing. When you select a device, a notification will be sent saying the file has been shared.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/how-do-i-transfer-files-from-one-computer-to-another-computer)

 

Cloud Storage. The ever-reliable cloud. Google’s version, Google …

Tips On Cleaning Your Computer

It doesn’t matter if you have more than 5 fans, have just as much dust filters, or cover your computer case every after use (yes, some people do that), the insides of your PC will always collect dust and dirt especially if the case is open. There’s no escaping from it to happen. Since preventing dust is possible but will always have its validity, what you can do is to treat this issue. Clean your computer.

 

The goal is simple. Cool air has to successfully enter the case and hot air has to come out. This won’t happen if the filters are obstructed with dust and debris or the exhausts are blocked. If this happens, the computer or the components inside the case can overheat. And if that happens, you’ll be facing a bigger problem, if not the biggest.

 

To prevent this from happening, you want to do your best in removing all dust from the system so it becomes a good ground for cool air and clean environment.

Whenever cleaning your PC or its components, you need to take extra special care about static damage. Using an anti-static wristband is ideal, but if you don’t have one to hand, make sure to regularly ground yourself by touching your case or PSU housing.

  • Wear a dust mask or respirator if you want to avoid breathing in any of the dust and dirt you remove from your case.
  • Turn off your PC and unplug the power cable from the rear. If you want to be extra safe, unplug everything.
  • Move your computer to somewhere well ventilated if possible, or at least open a window or door to let fresh air into the room.
  • Remove the side panels and (if possible) the front panel of your case.
  • Use a lint-free cloth or can of compressed air to clean the dust from any dust filters, as well as any obvious collections in the base of the case.
  • Use a can of compressed air—we don’t recommend trying to blow forcefully yourself—to clean the dust from any heatsinks like your CPU or graphics card cooler.

(Via:https://www.pcgamer.com/how-to-clean-your-computer-case/)

 

Now that dust is everywhere, use a vacuum to clean the loose dust particles only on the floor. Anywhere but inside the case.

Once you’ve knocked all the dust loose, use a vacuum cleaner to clean up any dust that ends up on the floor. However, don’t use the vacuum directly on the interior of your case, as there is a real risk of static damage. (You could use one as a blower in a pinch, which Jarred regularly does, but don’t get the

Hard Drive-less Computer

Every computer has a brain called the Central Processing Unit. It is named so because all major processes happen here. All brains have memory storage. And under the memory is the ROM or the Read Only Memory, the RAM or the Random Access Memory, and the cache. Among these storage hardware is the HDD or the Hard Disk Drive.

 

Most computers you see on the market today whether desktops or laptops have a hard disk drive or hard drive in short, as the main storage memory. There are those that have SSDs Solid State Drive as well. Hard drives have been proven a reliable technology in the computing world that’s why they are still around today and are ever-improving. A computer cannot efficiently process things without a memory hardware. But it can do so without a hard drive. Really? Arguably so.

 

A computer can still function without a hard drive. This can be done through a network, USB, CD, or DVD. Believe it or not.

Although a hard drive is typically where an operating system is installed, there are a number of ways you can run a computer without one. Computers can be booted over a network, through a USB drive, or even off of a CD or DVD. When you attempt to run a computer without a hard drive, you will often be asked for a boot device.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/what-will-a-computer-do-without-a-hard-drive)

 

Upon startup. When a computer starts, various tests and checks are done. This is why you can’t immediately use the computer as soon as you see the desktop or the screen. You have to give it a minute or two.

When a computer first runs, a Power On Self Test (POST) is performed. This checks all of the hardware to make sure that everything is responding properly, then a series of system beeps are performed. The BIOS is loaded and the computer then looks for a boot device based upon the order of the devices in memory. These devices can be hard drives, network drives, external drives, or even removable media. Many servers are actual ran off of a single-network device with the hardware loading an operating system into RAM memory over the network.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/what-will-a-computer-do-without-a-hard-drive)

 

In cases where no devices are found, your computer will let you know and will present you with a blank screen, one message, and a cursor that’s blinking. Kind of like the first computers.

If your system runs through the list of devices in the BIOS and none are available for booting, it will simply perform a series of PC speaker beeps and inform you that no

Other Things To Consider When Buying A Mouse

You’ve done your research. You knew what you are looking for based on what you’ll use the mouse for. You’ve decided between a wireless mouse or a wired one. You’ve considered the dimension and the size. And of course, you’ve chosen the right shape and color for you (or maybe overlooked them because you decided they’re the last things to worry about). So now you might ask, can I proceed to the counter now? You can. If those are the only things you want to cover. Wait, there’s more? Yes. More specific criteria that is.

 

Mouse, like other parts of your computer, is still a machine. It has its technical and mechanical aspects. And if you are more on the picky side, then you might appreciate this article.

 

Sensors. The sensor type will depend on the manufacturer of the mouse.

From Razer’s “Dual Sensors” to Microsoft’s “BlueTrack” and Logitech’s “Darkfield,” advanced sensors offer a lot. On the gaming side of things, most companies offer calibration for different surfaces, insanely high DPI (covered later in this guide) and improved precision. And for the always-on-the-go office worker, some mice offer to work for you even on shiny surfaces like glass, marble and more.

(Via:https://www.groovypost.com/howto/guide-to-find-best-mouse-to-fit-your-needs/)

 

The positioning of the sensors is also crucial. The sensors must be positioned in the center of the mouse.

The off-center sensor, however, resulted in extremely poor accuracy when making sharp flicks to the left or right.

Unless you are using your mouse for casual browsing only, do watch out for sensor placement. Look for a photo of the bottom of the mouse before your purchase. If the sensor is positioned too far from the center of the mouse – stay away!

(Via:https://www.groovypost.com/howto/guide-to-find-best-mouse-to-fit-your-needs/)

 

Buttons. The different types and placements are vital as well. Again, it comes down to what you’ll use the mouse for.

Depending on how you use your mouse, you may need to consider the types of buttons and switches used. For late night web surfing or a busy office, you may want to consider a silent mouse. But for gaming or anything else where you really want to feel your clicks, you may want a mouse with more tactile feedback.

Aside from the feel of the buttons, there’s also the question of how many buttons you need. Some will be more than happy with a three button mouse (left, middle and right). Others… well, let’s just say they can never get enough.

Some advice when buying a mouse with more than three buttons is to make sure every button is easily within reach. If it takes you

The Basics Of Choosing The Best Computer Mouse

Can’t you just buy the first thing you see? After all, they all have a left clicker, a right clicker, and a scrolling wheel, right? Yes to the latter but no to the former. Much like choosing a computer, a smartphone, or even a camera, you have to consider what you will be using it for. The price and color can just come next.

 

Buying a mouse can be tricky especially online. You only get to see descriptions and pictures of it. There are reviews from some other people that have purchased and probably used it. But you simply can’t rely solely on them. How they use their mouse might be different from how you use yours. But how about going to a physical store? That would be easy right? Yes, it can, if you know what you are looking for. If you do your research before going to the store, finding a mouse would be much easier.

 

As mentioned, the first thing you should consider is what you will be using the mouse mostly for. It can be for work, gaming, or just regular surfing.

A mistake I made when first looking for my best mouse was that I was only looking for gaming products. My train of thought was “I have a gaming mouse now, so let’s just find a better one!”. But I realized that games were now far from priority – I was using my computer mostly for work. Although more complex tasks require their fair share of precision, you don’t necessarily need the “unmatched performance” of a gaming mouse. It was at that moment I could almost put my current gaming mouse to my ear and hear the marketing team laughing at me for spending my money on some shiny LEDs and a logo.

(Via:https://www.groovypost.com/howto/guide-to-find-best-mouse-to-fit-your-needs/)

 

Size and weight. This matters because if you are a gamer and you need to shot a moving zombie straight in the head, you’ll need a more accurate mouse. And smaller mice aren’t always. Wireless mice are more lightweight than wired ones.

Regardless of whether you have small or big hands, you are very likely to be used to a certain mouse size. Accuracy-wise I would advise people to stay away from little mice, regardless of how compact and portable they might be. But if performance isn’t an issue you can feel free to explore mice of all shapes and sizes.

Although plenty of mouse reviewers talk about size, very few seem to mention the importance of weight. The average weight of a wired mouse is anywhere between 90 and 100 grams. When you go

What Are The Different Kinds Of Computers?

We use computers for different reasons and different tasks. But either we’re at the office or not, computers remain the same in terms of function. They write documents, save media files, send emails, let you search the web, tabulate data, update your social media, and all the computing processes there is. But these computers are the ones that we commonly know of. There are other types that seem unfamiliar with most people. Even these computers we use in the office or at home can differ from each other base on how heavy we use them. For example, if you are active on social media, you can always use a computer to update or upload files. But if you use it for business or as a job, then you will need a computer that’s best suited for more creative tasks.

 

Now let’s check out the other types of computers.

 

Supercomputers. You might have probably heard of this one. These are the fastest and biggest computers that exist. They are used to calculate weather patterns, quantum physics, and even perform mock nuclear weapon detonation.

The “Father of Supercomputing,” Seymour Cray, built the first supercomputer in 1963 called the CDC 6600, according to Cray Inc. He founded the company Cray Research to focus on engineering supercomputer systems. Supercomputers provide the fastest processing speed of any computer. Used for highly complex calculations, supercomputers possess extreme processing capabilities. For example, the Jaguar, a Cray Inc. supercomputer, operates at 1750 Teraflops (floating point operations per second) at peak performance—which means the system can calculate 1,750,000 Gigabytes per second. Supercomputers work behind the scenes to drive the most advanced information research forward. They are used for various highly specified applications including weather research, quantum physics, nuclear weapon detonation simulations and a class of problems called the “Grand Challenge problems,” a set of problems requiring a high-performance computer.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/types-of-computers-their-functions)

 

Mid-range computers are called so after the rise of desktop computers. They were used to do various applications.

The mid-range computer, originally called the minicomputer and currently called a server, is between a microcomputer and mainframe computer (as related to size and power). The term “minicomputer” developed during the 1960s to describe computers that utilized transistor technology. During the 1970s and 1980s, the development of microcomputers—or desktops—placed minicomputers in the mid-range designation. They were considered a more powerful single-user machine. True minicomputers began to decline, however, due to a less-expensive minicomputer that used microprocessor technology. Mid-range computers provide processing services for several applications. They are used to run back-end applications such as enterprise email, database systems and network-wide antivirus software.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/types-of-computers-their-functions)

 …

The Challenges of Using a Computer

If there is something that mankind has so successfully, effectively, and profitably invented, it’s the computer, the first vessel for the other triumphantly discovered internet.

 

Computers have made great strides ever since their creation. Historically, computing was first related to numbers. And the earliest tool recognized to count numbers was the abacus. Hence, the name computer.

 

Computers are useful in many different fields both at home and at work.

They can be used as research tools, scouring the internet and online databases for information about all different topics. Information that’s found can easily be downloaded and saved or printed to hard copy.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/pros-cons-of-the-use-of-computers)

 

There’s not one office that doesn’t have a computer. In fact, they might be the most functional and operational items in the office. That’s all thanks to their multitasking skills of writing documents, sending emails, making presentations, scheduling meetings, doing training, etc.

Computers are also often more efficient for producing written work, whether a financial spreadsheet where numbers are automatically totaled up without the need of a calculator or a word processing document with automatic spellchecking and easy, paper-free editing.

Documents created on a computer can also easily be backed up, shared and searched, unlike paper documents that need to be stored in secure spaces and physically transported and examined.

They’ve also boosted efficiency in other areas of business by allowing people to work remotely – when on business trips, for example – and by automating tasks in fields like manufacturing.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/pros-cons-of-the-use-of-computers)

 

At home, you can use it to do shopping, be active on social media, plan your out-of-the-country trip, search for recipes or housekeeping DIYs, and a whole lot more.

Computers can be also convenient shopping tools, making it possible to find any number of products without having to visit a store or thumb through a paper catalog. And they’re excellent for communication, letting people share photos, send emails and disseminate life updates on their own schedules for friends and family to see.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/pros-cons-of-the-use-of-computers)

 

So what’s the deal about the challenge of using a computer? Well, for a start, since they are uber- efficient, they can replace you at work. Second, they are not soldiers. Your orders won’t always be accepted, sometimes not even welcomed, because they are programmed. Third, they can make you glued to them and not do anything else. Fourth, your privacy will be at stake. And fifth, they can give you addiction.

While they can make workplaces more efficient, they often do so effectively by putting people out of work as their jobs are replaced by automation. They can also increase

HDD and SSD – How Do They Differ?

Before we dive in with their differences, let’s look at their similarities. Hard Disk Drive (HDD) and Solid State Drive (SSD) are both storage components of your computer. Both also come in external or portable form. But how they function and store data are completely different.

 

Whenever consumers shop for new computers, even second-hand ones, they always check for the storage. And what they commonly encounter as the storage of say, example 1TB, is the hard drive, and very rarely the SSD. But some desktops and laptops have SSD in them as storage. Ultimately, what you use your computer for will determine which one you will need more. Wait, you can run a computer without an HDD? Well technically, yes. But it will be tricky.

 

The reason why HDD is one of the first things you see when shopping for a computer is because its quality and technology is tried and tested with time. 5 decades, to be precise.

The technology behind hard disk drives is well known and well-tested. Hard disk drives have been around for more than 50 years, steadily increasing their storage capacity and decreasing their physical size. HDDs rely on spinning disks, or platters, to read and write data.

(Via:https://www.crucial.com/usa/en/ssd-vs-hdd)

 

Spinning platters and moving arms are what mainly compose a hard disk drive.

Hard disk drives consist of one or more magnetically-sensitive platters, an actuator arm with a read/write head on it for each platter, and a motor to spin the platters and move the arms. There is also an I/O controller and firmware that tells the hardware what to do and communicates with the rest of the system.

(Via:https://www.crucial.com/usa/en/ssd-vs-hdd)

 

HDDs have stood the test of time. They have a trusted and reliable technology. Moreover, they are more affordable than SSDs even with the same storage amount. And compared to SSDs, they also come with more storage in the market. The bad? They use physical power. The moving parts can stop working when your computer is mishandled, especially laptops.

The drawbacks to HDDs are a result of the mechanical parts used to read and write data, as physically finding and retrieving data takes more time than electronically finding and retrieving data. The mechanical parts can skip or even fail if they are handled roughly or dropped. This is a concern in laptops, but not as much in desktops. HDDs are also heavier and use more energy than comparable SSDs.

(Via:https://www.crucial.com/usa/en/ssd-vs-hdd)

 

An SSD, on the other hand, utilizes flash memory. This means that its processes are electronic, not physical.

Solid state drives use flash memory to