Change And Reset Password On Your Mac Computer

Need to change your Mac password? If you need to, don’t worry. You can easily do it.

Changing your password from time to time is important. It actually is a good practice to change your password regularly. Of course, you just have to remember it. If you forget it, there’s still no reason for you to worry. You can easily change and reset your password on your Mac computer.

Here’s are the simple steps that can help you change the password in your Mac computer.

If you know your password, you can login to your account and reset it with a few easy steps.

1. Log into your Mac.

2. Open the Apple menu (the Apple logo at the top-left of your screen) and choose “System Preferences.” You may also have it pinned to your menu bar (it’s a gray gear).

3. Click “Users & Groups.”

4. Select your user account on the left of the box and click the padlock in the bottom left to make your changes.

5. Click “Change Password.”

6. Enter your current password, your new password (twice) and a hint to help you remember your password (don’t make it too obvious). Click “Change Password” to complete the process.

(Via: https://www.newstimes.com/technology/businessinsider/article/How-to-change-your-Apple-ID-and-device-passwords-13841102.php)

Changing password is a lot different from resetting it. To say the least, the latter leaves you clueless as to what your password is. You really have no idea what it is but you shouldn’t worry about it. You can always reset your password but before you do so, keep this in mind.

Before you attempt to reset your password, check that you’re typing the correct upper and lower case letters and that Caps Lock isn’t turned on. Your password field may also have a question mark, which will display a password hint when clicked.

(Via: https://www.newstimes.com/technology/businessinsider/article/How-to-change-your-Apple-ID-and-device-passwords-13841102.php)

It’s not just your mom or grandma who usually forgets passwords. Everybody forgets passwords. When you do forget yours,  you can refer to these simple steps to reset.

There are two ways you can reset your Mac password. First of which is by using your Apple ID.

You may be able to reset your password using your Apple ID.

1. To trigger this option, keep entering passwords until you’re given the prompt that you can reset your password using your Apple ID.

Note: If you don’t see this message after 3 or more password attempts, then you don’t have this option and will have to try another method.

2. Click the arrow next to the prompt message and enter your Apple ID.

3. Create a new password and password hint.

4. Restart your

What’s Your Backup System In Case Your Hard Drive Crashes?

What if your hard drive crashes? What would you do? Would you worry? If not, you probably have a backup system in place.

All you really need is a good backup system to survive a hard drive crash. Unfortunately, not everybody has a backup system. For folks who already have one, they’ve probably had to experience a hard drive crash to realize the need for a backup system.

Such is the case with Harrison Jacobs, an international correspondent who learned the hard way. He had never had a backup system. So, when his hard drive crashed, he lost a lot.

I’ve made a lot of mistakes since I left New York to travel around the world as Business Insider’s international correspondent. By far the worst was when the external hard drive with all of my photos, videos, and interviews failed.

(Via: https://www.businessinsider.com/back-up-photos-google-photos-external-hard-drive-2019-1)

Thinking that hard drives don’t fail is a mistake most people are guilty of. They rely so much on their hard drives that they take it for granted. That’s exactly what happened to Harrison.

There was one mistake I made during my first six months on the road that was not funny at all. Even now, when I think about it, I get a little sick to my stomach.

It happened innocuously enough. I was editing photos while sitting on a couch in an Airbnb when I shifted a little too much and knocked my external hard drive, a Seagate Expansion Portable Hard Drive. The drive dismounted and, rather than keep editing photos, I went off to sleep.

When I plugged it in two days later, I heard a clicking sound. After trying every online-forum solution possible, I brought it to a data specialist and got the worst news: a head crash, the worst kind of hard drive failure possible. Even if the hard drive had been semi-recoverable, it would have cost me hundreds, if not thousands of dollars to recover the data.

Thanks to one bad jolt, I lost three months’ worth of photos, interviews, and videos. When I found out, I had a full-blown panic attack.

(Via: https://www.businessinsider.com/back-up-photos-google-photos-external-hard-drive-2019-1)

Who would have thought that a single jolt could damage a hard drive? Unfortunately, in Harrison’s case, it did. Since he didn’t have a backup system, his data got severely affected by the damaged hard drive. That painful experience led him to a foolproof backup system.

First, he switched to a solid-state drive.

My first step was to find a reliable and fast external hard drive that I could trust as my primary backup. The best solution these days — though not the most affordable —

Safety Tips To Keep Hackers Away

Hackers are everywhere. You’ll never really know when they’ll strike. When they do, they will take away vital data from your computer.

No one wants to get hacked. Unfortunately, it happens. Hackers are heartless people. That’s why it’s important to understand what they do and how they do it.

A recent public forum explained what hacking is all about.

What is hacking and how can it be avoided?

These two questions were among many addressed on Tuesday at a public forum titled “You Have Been Hacked!” featuring Charles J. Lesko Jr., director of graduate studies in the ECU College of Engineering and Technology.

“Hacking” refers to the act of someone gaining unauthorized access into a computer or network, Lesko said.

“Anything that’s got digital capability nowadays has the ability for someone to — in some way, shape or form — alter,” he said. “That’s the age that we’re living in now.”

(Via: http://www.reflector.com/News/2019/04/10/You-ve-Been-Hacked.html)

Why do hackers do what they do? Here’s what Lesko has to say about that:

There are many nefarious reasons for hacking, but the primary one is to get your money, Lasko said.

(Via: http://www.reflector.com/News/2019/04/10/You-ve-Been-Hacked.html)

Lesko also offers some safety tips to keep the hackers away.

Never respond to a request from any organization or a business that sends an email asking you for your user ID and password, Lesko said.

“That’s an immediate delete,” he said. “Unless you trust (something) explicitly, don’t (click on it).”

Know the difference between “http” and “https,” letters that appear in the address of a website, Lesko said. The “s” indicates that the website connection is secure.

Regarding passwords, it is best to have ones that are complex and secure, Lesko said. People tend to use simple passwords, even as simple as “password” and “pa$$word,” because they are easy to remember. But they are also easy for hackers to break into.

(Via: http://www.reflector.com/News/2019/04/10/You-ve-Been-Hacked.html)

The key is, never trust emails that ask you to share or update your personal information on the attached link. To start with, organizations or businesses, like banks, will never ask you to update personal information online.
So, if you get an email that seems to look like it’s from your bank, verify it first. Do not trust it and do exactly what Lesko says. Delete it.

Knowing the difference between “http’ and “https” is critical especially if you do a lot of research online. It’s really just a matter of looking out for the letter “s” when you choose a website.

When it comes to password management, Lesko adds;

Lesko recommended using a “password manager” tool that allows computer users to have a range

Protection For The Ultimate Data Storage

We are all dependent on data. No matter who we are, we rely on data to make it through the day. Data make the world go around nowadays.

We have so much data that we are always on the lookout for the best storage. One of the most common data storages for regular folks like you and me is a computer or laptop. There’s a lot of data, we just can’t live without, stored in our computer or maybe laptop. That’s just for regular folks like you and me.

Photographers and videographers need humongous data storage for all their work files. Data storage is an issue they face constantly. That’s why the G-Speed Shuttle with Thunderbolt seems to be the ultimate storage for them.

The G-Speed Shuttle with Thunderbolt a very interesting proposition, both for stills photographers and videographers. Yes, it is big, bulky and costly, but it’s as fast as a regular USB-C SSD drive and offers storage capacities you just don’t get with regular external drives.

(Via: https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/reviews/g-speed-shuttle-4bay-thunderbolt-3-16tb-review)

While it seems to be a costly solution for a huge data storage, it might just be the ultimate data storage photographers and videographers are looking for.

Photographers are always running out of storage space, and there can’t be many of us who don’t need an external drive to supplement the computer’s internal storage.

The traditional choice is to pick an external hard drive, but even the best portable hard drives are pretty slow for bulk image transfers and video editing, and while regular desktop hard drives are faster, even these have their limits. Another option is to invest in SSD (solid state storage) instead, but while this is super-fast, it’s also super-expensive. There is a third option – a desktop RAID system like the G-Technology G-Speed Shuttle.

(Via: https://www.digitalcameraworld.com/reviews/g-speed-shuttle-4bay-thunderbolt-3-16tb-review)

According to Digitalcameraworld.com, its huge potential storage is ideal for speedy transfer of data and data redundancy. The G-Speed Shuttle with Thunderbolt is also portable, which makes it very convenient for photographers on the go.

If you’re familiar with RAID, then you’re probably intrigued at how such system can fit into one portable hardware. If you’re not familiar with RAID, then it’s time you learn more about it. Since the G-Speed Shuttle is a desktop RAID system, then it’s definitely the kind of data storage that’s worth looking into. A portable RAID system sounds awesome.

RAID stands for Redundant Array of Independent Disks. A RAID drive gets a series of disk drives working together to offer more capacity, higher speeds and data ‘redundancy’ to allow for disk failures. There are different types of RAID setup – the G-Speed

What It Really Means To Go Paperless

It’s good to go paperless. In this age and age, it’s actually the way to go. Since it’s so easy to digitize files these days, it makes a lot of sense to go paperless. Just think of all the physical space you could save. You wouldn’t have to keep copies of old files in old filing cabinets that take up so much physical space.

Going paperless means getting rid of the clutter. No, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re going to throw everything away. You’d have to digitize all your files first to store in a virtual space. Once you’ve done that, then maybe you could throw away the clutter. It’s really up to you but you would have to be very careful.

An important follow-up to scanning is getting rid of any paper to reduce the chance of identity theft, which saw increased fraud reports in 2018, according to Federal Trade Commission findings. Of the 10 shredders we tested, Wirecutter’s favorite can take up to 10 pages at a time. For most people, the cross-cut model works just fine, but if you have particularly sensitive documents, a micro-cut shredder makes it pretty much impossible to put paper back together.

(Via: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/09/smarter-living/wirecutter/go-paperless-home-office-taxes.html)

You really have to be careful when throwing out old documents. Make sure they’re shredded pretty well. If not, the information of the documents might be misused.

A good example of documents that you could digitize are your tax records. Your tax records over the years probably make up most of the clutter that you can’t seem to get rid of. If you really want to go paperless, you could start digitizing your tax records.

If your tax seasons have involved too much paper wrangling, consider throwing out your file cabinets and going paperless. Everything you have to track for the IRS you can also keep digitally.

(Via: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/09/smarter-living/wirecutter/go-paperless-home-office-taxes.html)

It takes a lot of work to digitize files. Imagine scanning every single file you’ve kept over the years. Nonetheless, you always have to keep in mind that you have to scan all your tax documents properly.

Gil Charney, director at the Tax Institute at H&R Block, said, “The IRS will accept electronic digital versions of documents provided that the documents are retrievable and legible, so a poorly scanned document is not going to suffice if important elements of that document are not readable.”

(Via: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/09/smarter-living/wirecutter/go-paperless-home-office-taxes.html)

You could always rely on an app to make scanning easy for you. However, you have to consider the fact that your tax documents are highly confidential. It contains sensitive personal information. You really wouldn’t want it to be compromised, …

Good News For Apple Users

Are you an loyal Apple fan? Well, here’s some good news for you, especially if you’re planning to buy a new Mac or you’re already a proud owner of  one.

There’s no need to pay for anything if you want data transferred to your new Mac. The data migration fee has finally been dropped.

After speaking with an Apple Store Operations Specialist, TidBITS reported that the company has dropped the data migration fee charged when users move their content from an old computer to a new Mac.

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

That’s really good news because Apple’s data migration fee was quite high. You would really have had to factor that in if, in case, you wanted to upgrade your old Mac to a new one.

Previously, when you went to the Apple Store to upgrade your computer to a new one or had some repairs done, you’d have to pay a whopping $99 to migrate the data to your new device or new hard drive. As first reported by TidBITS on Tuesday, Apple quietly discontinued charging this particular fee.

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

So, if you’re seriously considering replacing your old Mac, go right ahead. Now is the perfect time for it.

An Apple Store Operations Specialist told the tech news site that “Beginning April 2, there will be no cost of Data Migrations with the purchase of a new Mac or Data Transfers with a repair.”

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

For tech savvy folks, data transfer from one Mac to another can easily be done.

Nevertheless, if you’re confident in your tech savviness, you could do so yourself at home; Apple offers a set of instructions explaining how to move content from an old computer — even if it’s a PC — to your new Mac. If you got into the habit of uploading your files to iCloud, there’s no transfer even necessary when you change computers.

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

For folks, who have no technical knowledge or patience to deal with data transfer, they can always just go to an Apple store to get it done for free.

In any case, if you’d rather a professional handle the work, you can now go to the Apple Store to have it done for free.

(Via: https://news.yahoo.com/apple-quietly-nixes-fee-transfer-data-old-mac-091257923.html)

Data transfer is not the only issue that you have to deal with when you buy a new Mac. There are a lot of other issues that you could be confronted with. After all, anything can happen to your new Mac.

You wouldn’t have much of a problem if issues arise within the first year of your purchase. Your new Mac would still be …

An Easy Way Recover A Damaged Hard Drive

Your hard drive can get damaged. More often than not, a clicking sound is a sure sign of a damaged hard drive. Once you hear that clicking sound, your hard drive is about to go.

That’s something you don’t want to happen. With all the files stored in your hard drive, you don’t want it damaged. Unfortunately, that is totally impossible. Your hard drive is bound to get damaged.

With digital devices becoming more prevalent for communication, research, and storage purposes, ensuring that one keeps a backup of their data has never been more important. A sudden, unexpected loss of data can be devastating and might mean that thousands of irreplaceable photos or the entirety of a crucial project at work may be gone forever.

(Via: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/4252957)

In the event that you end up with a damaged hard drive, you can always rely on the services of the Hard Drive Recovery Associates.

Hard Drive Recovery Associates offers their customers a way to attempt the recovery of lost data with their data recovery services, and is proud to announce that they have received 5 star reviews on their Google My Business page.

The company offers data recovery for RAID, Mac, and PC hard disks along with SSD drives. They specialize in recovering both damaged and clicking hard drives.

(Via: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/4252957)

Hard drives get damaged at a time when you least expect it. When it happens, your natural tendency is to get really pissed off. Instead of getting any work done, you end up dealing with a damaged hard drive. Precious time just goes down the drain.

To matters worse, you realize the possibility of losing your files. Finally, you panic. You don’t know what to do. How can you possibly recover a damaged hard drive when you’re having a panic attack? Will you ever get back your files from your damaged hard drive? Apparently, you can.

“It’s easy. You might think it’s not but it is. Retrieving data from the hard drive is not as hard as you think,” says Hard Drive Recovery Associates. “Unfortunately, most people think it’s hard. For that reason, not a lot of people think about retrieving data from their hard drive. When their computer or laptop gets busted, they just end up buying a new one. If they want to salvage any of their files, they’ll just try to retrieve data from their external drives.” Most people won’t bother with the hard drives of their old computers or laptops.

(Via: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/4252957)

Purchasing a new computer or a laptop is not a solution to a damaged hard drive. Unfortunately, the less techy folks …

There Is Such A Thing As Data Privacy Day

There’s a day for almost everything. For example, there’s a World Backup Day. It’s held every 31st of March. Obviously, this particular day celebrates the importance of backing up data. So, if you’re not aware of such a day, you are now. If you don’t back up your files, you should. Think about it. There wouldn’t be any World Backup Day if backing up weren’t so important in the first place.

Another example is the National Download Day. While it’s not exactly a world day, it’s still a day that’s celebrating the importance of downloading. This particular day is celebrated every 28th of December. Interestingly, there’s a reason why it’s celebrated on that day. Apparently, it that’s time of the year when most of the apps are downloaded.

Now, there’s such a thing as a Data Privacy Day. It’s celebrated every 28th of January. This is an international holiday that aims to increase the awareness of data privacy. What’s interesting about it is that it’s not new.

The non-profit National Cybersecurity Alliance marked the occasion, observed since 2007, with a gathering of corporate privacy policy wonks at LinkedIn’s San Francisco, California, headquarters. Kelvin Coleman, executive director of the NCA, presided over the gathering, which he characterized as an exploration of the opportunities and challenges for the privacy road ahead.

(Via: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/01/29/data_privacy_day_comes_and_goes/)

Other sources would say that the Data Privacy Day began in 2008. Whether it’s 2007 or 2008, the point is, who knew there was such a day? I didn’t. The ignorance on such topic could probably explain why there are still a lot of red flags in data privacy nowadays.

In the opening panel, Eva Velasquez, president and CEO of the Identity Theft Resource Center, framed the discussion with a reference to her organization’s 2018 data exposure report. The report found a 23 per cent decline in the number of data loss incidents and a 126 per cent increase in the amount of personally identifiable information exposed, amounting to almost 198 million records.

Data spills of this sort would not happen if there were actual privacy, if the organizations involved lacked any records to lose.

(Via: https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/01/29/data_privacy_day_comes_and_goes/)

Data privacy is a vast topic to tackle. While it means a lot to both the consumer and the business owner; it serves different purposes for both.

Data privacy for a consumer would probably be just about his or her own personal data that he or she would want to have control of. For a business owner, data privacy is very critical. It could make or break the business.

Data has been likened to oil as a commodity that fuels

Hard Drive Failures Don’t Have To Lead To Data Loss

You can’t escape a hard drive failure. However, you can survive it and move on from it. That is, if you know how to deal with it. The inevitability of hard drive failures is real. You’ll be facing one, two, three, or maybe more in your lifetime. Come out of a hard drive failure unscathed by averting data loss.

Here are some helpful tips to survive a hard drive failure that usually leads to data loss. The first of which is to back up your data.

The rule of thumb to follow when making data backups, says Michael Cobb, director of engineering at DriveSavers, a data-recovery firm in Novato, California, is ‘3-2-1’: “It’s three copies, [on] two different media, one off-site.”

(Via: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01040-w)

The second tip is to make use of an automatic backup system. In the event that your shared or hard drive fails, you can always get back your files from your online backup service provider.

When making backups, automation is key. Kelly Smith, a cardiac geneticist at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, has access to a shared network drive that is copied to tape. She used to move her files to the drive manually, but only monthly; in the event that the drive failed, newer files could be lost. An automated cloud-based backup system called Druva inSync, from data-protection firm Druva in Sunnyvale, California, now obviates that concern. “It’s one less thing I have to worry about,” she says.

(Via: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01040-w)

The third tip is to regularly check all your backups. If your data are backed up to the cloud, check if all your files are complete and updated. Reliable online backup services should be able to back up and update all your files automatically. As long as your computer is connected to the internet, the backup service should be able to do its work silently and efficiently. Still, you have to take some time to check your online backup account to see if all your files are backed up and updated.

Don’t assume that your backups are working: test them. Can you open your files? Do you have the necessary applications, login credentials and registration keys to run them? Wickes’ departmental IT service offers staff a free account on CrashPlan from Code42 Software in Minneapolis, Minnesota, which automates backups to the cloud. One day, Wickes decided to test her backup, only to find that it had stopped syncing six months earlier. “I was fine because I had a local Time Machine backup, as well,” she says, referring to Apple’s backup system for computers running its Macintosh operating system. Reiterating the advice he

Here’s How You Can Undelete Files In Windows

It’s easy to undelete files in Windows. The first thing you do is to check the Recycle Bin. More often than not, you’ll be able to find and restore a file from there. Thanks to the Recycle Bin, you can easily undelete files once you realize they weren’t meant to be deleted in the first place.

There’s no doubt that the Recycle Bin helps lessen the chances of losing files. You can always check it before you do anything drastic. However, you do need to know that the Recycle Bin does not keep deleted files forever.

The Recycle Bin does have a capacity limit and, when it’s full, Windows will empty it automatically to reclaim hard drive space. If you regularly have second thoughts about files you’ve deleted, this may cause problems, so if you have a large hard drive with lots of free space, consider increasing the Recycle Bin’s capacity.

(Via: https://home.bt.com/tech-gadgets/computing/windows-10/how-to-recover-restore-deleted-file-11363943488049)

Increasing the capacity of the Recycle Bin is a good option especially if you don’t clean it out regularly. That way, you wouldn’t have to worry about the files you’ve deleted. If you have no idea as to how to increase the capacity of the Recycle Bin, here’s how you can do it.

Right-click the Recycle Bin icon and choose Properties. When the dialog box opens, make sure the ‘Custom size’ option is selected and type a larger number in the box next to it. This is measured in megabytes (MB) and 1,000 megabytes is one gigabyte (GB). A number that’s around 10% of your hard drive capacity works well. This works in all versions of Windows and remember that the Recycle Bin will only use this amount of space when it’s full.

(Via: https://home.bt.com/tech-gadgets/computing/windows-10/how-to-recover-restore-deleted-file-11363943488049)

Seems pretty easy, right? Even if it’s pretty easy to increase the capacity space of the Recycle Bin, you still need to consider the fact that it will reach the maximum capacity. What that means is that you can’t really rely on the Recycle Bin to keep deleted files. What if it reaches the maximum capacity and it wipes out all your deleted files?

Another way to  undelete files is to make use of  the System Restore feature of Window.

To use this feature, open a window and browse to the folder that contained (or still contains) the file or folder you want to recover. Right-click the file/folder and select Restore previous versions.

When the dialog box opens, select the version of the file/folder you want, if there’s more than one copy (look at the ‘Date modified’ column), and click the Restore button.

(Via: https://home.bt.com/tech-gadgets/computing/windows-10/how-to-recover-restore-deleted-file-11363943488049)

The thing about System …